Bullion knot crash course

Bullion knot crash course

Bullion knots is probably one of the trickiest stitches in hand embroidery. It is surprising that some people might even hate it, while it looks so lovely. But I understand those feelings of frustration. I also struggled with this stitch, getting one messy bullion after another and thinking that something must be wrong with me, my hands or my brain because it looks so easy in diagrams or pictures, but why couldn't I get it right??

I already made a post telling how to make a bullion knot and pistil bullion. But... I thought it is not enough. There are more things that should be shared. In this post I will tell about the alternative way of working the bullion knot which many might find easier, I will also touch on the significance of the direction of wraps around the needle and possible reasons for messy bullions. And in the end you will see a tutorial for the bullion knot rose :) So, let's start!
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Stitching practice: red roses branch

Stitching practice: red roses branch

You know, how they recommend daily practice to beginning painters? The more you train the movements of your hand holding the brush, learn blending colors, practice drawing various shapes and forms – all of the experience from this practice piles up into practical knowledge and makes one a better professional.

This rule can be applied to any craft and needlework is not an exception. Mastering the art of hand embroidery takes time and effort and sometimes you have to be prepared for failures. That's why I like to go for small practice embroidery pieces. I tend to not take them "too" seriously – this is a field for experimentation and trying something new, or just for practicing something I already know. At the same time, I still strive for a decent result.

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Progress report: Mint Tea pattern stitched

Progress report: Mint Tea pattern stitched

Summer is coming, but the new bag is still not ready! GASP. But there is good news – at least the embroidery for it is done. The design was inspired by the mint tea – one of my favorite drinks :)

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Bullion stitch and bullion pistil stitch

Bullion stitch and bullion pistil stitch

You probably spotted before all these beautiful roses or lavender flowers worked with bullion stitches? This stitch was a fantastic discovery for me.

Despite its peculiar look, it is actually wonderfully versatile – it's used for stitching flowers, hair (including braids), rye, caterpillars and it is also a component of many compound stitches. For example, the bullion picot buttonhole edging.

You can also play with its size and shape, so the possibilities for its use in hand embroidery are very wide. It is a little tricky to stitch though, so in this post, I will share a bullion stitch and bullion pistil stitch tutorials as well as some universal tips on how to get it done right.
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How to end embroidery thread and not feel anxious about it

How to end embroidery thread and not feel anxious about it

There are two essential things a beginning embroiderer should learn first-hand: how to begin and end embroidery stitches.

Let's be honest, both of these topics are... tricky. There is quite a number of nuances that require attention. Ending hand embroidery thread might create some anxiety in the minds of stitchers. Did I secure it well enough? What if it comes loose?

Have you ever asked yourself those questions? I did. And it's normal. As easy as ending embroidery thread is, it still requires some guidance. So let's take a look at how you can end your embroidery stitches in an anxiety-free way.
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Chinese knot made easy

How to stitch Chinese knot

This month I've been covering hand embroidery knot stitches on StitchFloral. And although initially, I was going to talk only about basics, in the end, I couldn't stop myself from telling about the Chinese knot. Yeah, this mysterious guy which is often referred to as “Forbidden stitch”;)
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Needlebook complete! Or, confessions of a clumsy stitcher

Needlebook complete! Or, confessions of a clumsy stitcher

It's tough to be a clumsy perfectionist. When I planned it, the needlebook was supposed to be much neater and tidier – but my sewing skills let me down. But you know what.. I like it as it is. Clumsy, a little awkward, but still a lovely sweetheart :)
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6 tips for better chain stitch

6 tips for better chain stitch


I'm currently working on the summer tote bag that I want to get ready this month. The design was born a while ago, but the main problem was to pick fitting stitches for it. My all-time faves among the line stitches have always been stem stitch and split stitch, so at first, I was going to employ one of them. As usually. But then I thought... Isn't it unfair that I give so little chance for chain stitch to shine in my embroidery? 

This is a truly wonderful stitch too, it gives nice solid lines and has that fun “crochet” look. Except that.... it is a bit tricky in some ways ;) 

So, today I'd like to share some tips that I find really helpful for those who struggle with this stitch like I did. In this post, you will learn how to work the curves with chain stitch, make the corners sharp, join up the ends of shapes, save the thread and other important stuff. Away with hesitation! Let's learn how to kill it when you chain stitch!
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Colonial knot and how's it different from french knot?

Colonial knot and how's it different from french knot?

French knot is, undoubtedly, the most popular knot stitch out there. But it has a “twin” - colonial knot. Jump in to explore the similarities and differences between the two!
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Needlebook progress and a quick twig tutorial

Needlebook progress and a quick twig tutorial

The needlebook I'm currently working on has just got a face!
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My design: Crewel Heart

Crewel Heart hand embroidery


As promised, today I'm showing one of my old designs. I call it Crewel Heart, although it is worked in DMC floss thread and not wool, so technically, calling it crewel is a bit of a stretch. But it was inspired by Crewel embroidery designs and patterns – I love this embroidery style so deeply! - therefore, Crewel Heart it is.
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French Knot and Pistil stitch

French knot tutorial


I'm starting to cover the knots family of stitches and, naturally, the first post will be about the French knot. This stitch is an absolute must-have in your hand embroidery stitches range, because hardly any other stitch can compete with this one in versatility.
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Hello, May! And April round-up

April embroidered projects

With April coming to the end and May rolling in, I decided to sum up my first month of constant blogging and voice my plans for the next month :)
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