What is split stitch and how to work it



Today I want to speak about another extremely useful line stitch – split stitch. I call it a line stitch, but, for sure, it can be used as a filler as well. But first, let's see how it must be worked.

How to split stitch: 

After you make a running stitch from point A to point B, bring your needle back up in the middle of the stitch (point C), piercing right through the thread. Right through the thread. Then you make a new stitch and pierce it in the middle again, which is now the end of the previous stitch. And we go on like this. 



As you see, split stitch is quite similar to stem stitch in technique. The difference is that in stem stitch your needle passes the thread from one of the sides, while in split stitch you break through the thread of the previously made stitch.

Oh, I hope I'm making it clear.

Now, it is most convenient to work split stitch when you have an even number of thread strands in your needle: 2/4/6. Because it allows you evenly split them apart. However, sometimes you may want to work with one strand in the needle. This is not a problem! You see, every single thread strand consists of two finer ones, so even if you have only one strand, it still can be split apart very nicely. Look:



The lower row is worked with one strand of thread in the needle, see how the needle easily splits the strand into two halves? Similarly, if you have 3 or 5 strands in the needle, I would recommend splitting one of them in halves. This way you'll have 1,5 or 2,5 strand on either side after splitting them, which makes stitches look steady.

So, where can we use split stitch?

I mostly use it for lines and shapes' outlines. Especially prior to applying satin stitch or long and short stitch. But, like I mentioned, it can be a great filler as well, adding a nice texture and “woven”-like look to the shapes.

Do you often use this stitch? What is your favourite way to employ it?

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